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Right to work, family leave, sick leave, government retirement program, wood stove rules

 

Check out these key votes made by elected officials in Wisconsin during the most recent legislative session, and go to www.votespotter.com to signup and see how your elected officials voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life.

 

Senate Bill 44, Adopt a "right to work" law: Passed 17 to 15 in the Senate on February 25, 2015, and 62 to 35 in the Assembly on March 5, 2015

To prohibit employers from requiring employees to pay union dues or fees as a condition of employment.

 

Assembly Bill 70, Establish a state-run retirement fund for Wisconsinites: Failed 36 to 60 in the Assembly on January 19, 2016

To create the Wisconsin Private Retirement Security Board, which will administer a state-run retirement plan for residents of the state. This vote was to suspend the rules and withdraw this bill from committee in order for the Assembly to consider it.

 

Assembly Bill 516, Mandate more employers grant family leave: Failed 36 to 60 in the Assembly on January 19, 2016

To mandate that employers of more than 25 employees offer those employees family leave. This is an increase from the current family leave law that applies to employers of more than 50 employees. The bill also expands the circumstances for which employers must provide family leave, and establishes a family and medical leave insurance program to be paid for by an additional payroll tax. This vote was to suspend the rules and withdraw this bill from committee in order for the Assembly to consider it.

 

Assembly Bill 474, Mandate paid sick leave: Failed 36 to 60 in the Assembly on January 19, 2016

To mandate that anyone in the state who employs at least one full- or part-time employee offer that employee paid sick leave. This vote was to suspend the rules and withdraw this bill from committee in order for the Assembly to consider it.

 

Assembly Bill 25, Prohibit stricter regulations of wood stoves: Passed 63 to 35 in the Assembly on June 9, 2015, and 19 to 13 in the Senate on March 15, 2016

To prohibit the state from issuing a state rule or enforcing a federal rule that applies a stricter emissions standard to residential wood stoves.

 

All about Iran: payments, assets, financial transactions, heavy water, and compensating terror attack victims

 

Check out these key votes made by elected officials in Congress during the current legislative session, and go to www.votespotter.com to signup and see how your elected officials voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life.

 

House Bill 5931, Prohibit prisoner release payments to Iran: Passed 254 to 163 in the House on September 22, 2016

To prohibit the U.S. government from making payments to Iran to release U.S. citizens held as prisoners.

 

House Bill 5461, Require report on Iranian officials’ assets: Passed 282 to 143 in the House on September 21, 2016

To require the Treasury Department to compile a report on the assets held by certain Iranian officials and disclose this report to the public. Opponents of the measure contend it is a way to undermine the recent nuclear deal with Iran.

 

House Bill 4992, Restrict financial transactions with Iran: Passed 246 to 181 in the House on July 14, 2016

To authorize regulations that prohibit financial institutions from directly or indirectly transferring dollars to Iran until the president certifies it is not supporting acts of international terrorism or developing weapons of mass destruction.

 

House Bill 5119, Prohibit the purchase of heavy water from Iran: Passed 249 to 176 in the House on July 13, 2016

To prohibit any federal agencies from purchasing heavy water from Iran, which is a substance used to produce nuclear bombs. This would block part of the Obama Administration’s nuclear deal with Iran.

 

House Bill 3457, Keep Iran sanctions until it compensates terror attack victims: Passed 251 to 173 in the House on October 13, 2015

To bar the White House from removing economic sanctions against Iran unless Iran compensates U.S. victims of terror attacks financed by the Iranian regime. Lifting economic sanctions is part of the deal the President negotiated with Iran on its nuclear bomb program. American courts have awarded $46 billion to over 1,300 victims of terrorist attacks sponsored by Iran. The White House says the bill would "obstruct implementation" of the Iran deal.

 

Same-sex weddings; civil asset forfeiture; stand your ground

 

Check out these key votes made by elected officials in Florida during the most recent legislative session, and go to www.votespotter.com to signup and see how your elected officials voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life. 

 

House Bill 43. To let religious institutions not provide services for same-sex weddings. Passed 82 to 37 in the House on March 2, 2016, and 23 to 15 in the Senate on March 3, 2016.

Establishes that clergy, churches and other religious institutions may choose to not participate or assisting a wedding ceremony if doing so would violate sincerely held religious beliefs. It also establishes that a tax-exempt organization that chooses to not participate or assist such a weeding will not lose its tax-exempt status for that decision.

 

Senate Bill 1044.  Asset forfeiture Passed 116 to 0 in the House on March 8, 2016, and 38 to 0 in the Senate on March 4, 2016.

To require that a person’s property may be seized by law enforcement only if that person has been arrested. It also requires that the government prove to a court that property was connected with a crime.  It it does not, the government must make a payment to the property owner.

 

House Bill 344. Stand your ground. Passed 24 to 12 in the Senate on January 28, 2016; died in the House Judiciary Committee.

To change the burden of proof in cases involving claims of self-defense. In pre-trial hearings, the burden would shift from the person who makes a claim of self-defense to the prosecution.

 

House Bill 7029. To give parents the right to enroll their children in any public district or charter school that has room. Passed 81 to 37 in the House on March 10, 2016, and 29 to 10 in the Senate on March 11, 2016.

To require school districts to enroll students who live outside their boundaries, provided there is room, and to publish information that is needed by parents who wish to enroll their students there. Parents would be responsible for transporting their children to the new district.

 

Capital punishment, abortion restrictions, aborted baby parts sales, illegal aliens and sanctuary cities

 

Check out these key votes made by elected officials in North Carolina during the most recent legislative session, and go to www.votespotter.com to signup and see how your elected officials voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life.

 

House Bill 297, Ban the sale of aborted baby parts: Passed 79 to 29 in the House on September 28, 2015, and 41 to 3 in the Senate on September 24, 2015

To prohibit the sale of an unborn child's remains that resulted from an abortion or miscarriage. The bill also bans the state from entering into contracts for family planning services with organizations that perform abortions.

 

House Bill 465, Impose more restrictions on abortion: Passed 71 to 43 in the House on June 3, 2015, and 32 to 16 in the Senate on June 1, 2015

To increase the waiting period for an abortion from one to three days, to limit the types of doctors that may perform abortions, and to mandate new inspections on abortion clinics. The bill also establishes the Maternal Mortality Review Commission, which will inspect records from health care facilities and pharmacies with the goal of reducing maternal deaths.

 

House Bill 318, Require state contractors verify they employ no illegal aliens and ban sanctuary cities: Passed 80 to 39 in the House on April 23, 2015, and 28 to 17 in the Senate on September 28, 2015

To mandate that, for most state contracts, a contractor must verify his or her employees’ legal status using the federal E-Verify program. The legislation also prohibits cities from banning their law enforcement officers from collecting information regarding an individual’s immigration or citizenship status and providing that information to the federal government.

 

House Bill 774, Change capital punishment procedure: Passed 74 to 34 in the House on July 29, 2015, and 33 to 16 in the Senate on July 27, 2016

To allow a medical professional other than a licensed physician to be present at the execution of a death sentence and to shield information about the drugs being used in executions from public disclosure.

 

Senate Bill 15, Reform unemployment compensation: Passed 36 to 7 in the Senate on August 27, 2015, and 83 to 27 in the House on August 20, 2015

To modify the state’s unemployment compensation system by, among other things, requiring a valid photo ID to collect benefits, allowing investigators more discretion to check for identity theft, and strengthening safeguards so that inmates do not collect benefits.

 

Modify government pensions, strip pensions from felons, transparency and costs of union agreements

 

Check out these key votes made by elected officials in Pennsylvania during the most recent legislative session, and go to www.votespotter.com to signup and see how your elected officials voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life.

 

Senate Bill 1071, Modify the public pension system: Passed 30 to 20 in the Senate on December 4, 2015, and failed 52 to 149 in the House on December 19, 2015 (the House passed an amended version of the bill on June 14, 2016)

To make changes to the defined-benefit pension plan for state and public school employees, including:  1) transitioning to a hybrid model comprising a smaller defined-benefit component and a defined-contribution component; and 2) implementing a risk sharing provision to reduce, but not eliminate, risk for taxpayers due to investment losses.

 

Senate Bill 1, Overhaul the pension system for state and public school employees: Passed 28 to 19 in the Senate on May 13, 2015, 106 to 89 in the House on June 30, 2015. Vetoed by the governor on July 9, 2015.

To replace the current defined-benefit retirement plan for state and public school employees with a hybrid plan that includes a defined-contribution component and a defined-benefit component. Currently, state and public school employees are eligible for an annual pension benefit after five years of full-time employment with the Commonwealth and/or a public school that is equal to:  the number of years they were employed by the Commonwealth and/or a public school, multiplied by the average of their three highest annual salaries, multiplied by .025 (.03 if they are a state legislator). The legislation requires new state and school employees (those hired after this legislation goes into effect) to enroll in a 401k-style plan as well as a cash-balance (defined-benefit) savings plan with a guaranteed annual interest rate equal to the long-term treasury bonds, capped at 4 percent.

 

House Bill 17, Strip pensions of public employee felons: Passed 188 to 2 in the House on May 18, 2016

To remove pensions from public employees convicted of, or pleading guilty to, felonies or crimes which are punishable by a prison sentence of more than five years.

 

Senate Bill 645, Require government entities to post proposed collective bargaining agreements on their websites: Passed 29 to 19 in the Senate on May 6, 2015

To require a proposed collective bargaining agreement to be made available on a public employer’s website. An agreement would have to be posted online two weeks prior and thirty days following the signing of the collective bargaining agreement. The posting would have to include: 1) a statement of the terms of the proposed collective bargaining agreement; and 2) an estimate of the costs to the public employer associated with the agreement.

 

Senate Bill 644, Require cost analysis of labor agreements: Passed 108 to 83 in the House on March 21, 2016

To require the Independent Fiscal Office to analyze proposed collective bargaining agreements to determine their cost before the state approves the agreements.

 

Wine at wineries, wine at farmer’s markets, and other business regulation

 

Check out these key votes made by elected officials in Ohio earlier this year, and go to www.votespotter.com to sign up and see how your elected officials voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life.

 

 

House Bill 342 Allow wineries to sell wine on their premises: Passed 96 to 1 in the House on 1/27/2016

 

To create the Ohio Farm Winery Permit which would allow Ohio wineries to sell their wine directly to consumers on site.

 

House Bill 178 Allow wineries to sell wine at farmer’s markets: Passed 97 to 1 in the House on 1/27/2016

To create a separate class of liquor license to allow Ohio wineries to sell their wine directly to consumers at certain farmer's markets.

 

House Bill 444 Allow free samples of beer, wine, and spirits: Passed 93 to 3 in the House on 5/24/2016

To remove the ban on sampling of beer, wine, or spirits at retail stores.

 

Senate Bill 141 Expand the ability of pharmacists to manage patient drug therapies Passed 32 to 0 in the Senate on 6/24/2016

To expand and clarify the ability of pharmacists to serve in a consulting capacity to multiple physicians and directly manage drug therapies with the patients.

 

House Bill 470 Regulate palliative care facilities Passed 92 to 5 in the House on 5/25/2016

To create a new regulatory structure to oversee palliative care facilities including licensing, inspections, and disciplinary systems.

 

Abortion, Immigration, Same-Sex adoption, Welfare Truants, Nude Dancing

 

Check out these key votes made by lawmakers during the 2015-16 Michigan Legislature, and go to www.votespotter.com to sign up and see how the people who represent you voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life.

  

Senate Bill 564, Criminalize selling aborted fetuses or body parts: Passed 26 to 10 in the Senate

To make it a crime to receive a financial benefit or any type of compensation for transferring or selling an embryo, fetus or neonate, including organs, tissues or cells, if this was obtained as the result of an elective abortion. The House has not voted on this bill.

 

Senate Bill 501, Require alien drivers have visa or passport while driving: Passed 37 to 0 in the Senate on February 4, 2016, and 90 to 18 in the House on May 12

To require resident aliens who drive a vehicle in Michigan to have both a valid drivers license issued by their native land and a passport or valid visa. Current law only requires a valid drivers license. (A legal alien can also get a Michigan drivers license.)

 

 

2015 House Bill 4188, Let adoption agencies refuse adoptions that violate moral convictions

Passed 65 to 44 in the House on March 18, 2015, and 26 to 12 in the Senate on June 10, 2015

To specify in statute that adoption agencies are not required to assist or participate in an adoption or placement that violates its written religious or moral convictions, including adoptions of a child by same sex couple. Also, to prohibit a state agency from discriminating or taking an “adverse action” against an adoption agency for this reason.

 

2015 House Bill 4041, Ban welfare for persistent truancy, Passed 74 to 36 in the House on March 26, 2015 and 26 to 12 in the Senate on May 26

To withhold welfare benefits from a household with children who are persistently truant from school. A truant child age 16 and above could be removed from the household/

 

Senate Bill 302, Impose ban on nude entertainment in bars: Passed 27 to 10 in the Senate on February 10, 2016

To ban fully nude performers at topless bars, or bars showing videos that depict this. This relates to a 2007 federal appeals court ruling that struck down Michigan’s previous law banning fully nude performers in bars, holding it was a violation of the First Amendment. The bill would specifically ban a performance that exposes specified body parts. The House has not voted on this bill.

 

Civil War monuments, taxpayer-funded abortions, and political donation write-off

 

Check out these key votes made by elected officials in Virginia during the most recent legislative session, and go to www.votespotter.com to signup and see how your elected officials voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life.

 

House Bill 587, Restrict local authority over monuments: Passed 82 to 16 in the House on February 10, 2016, and 21 to 17 in the Senate on February 29, 2016. Vetoed by the governor on March 10, 2016.

To prohibit local governments from removing or interfering with monuments or memorials erected for a war or conflict, such as the Civil War.

 

Override veto of House Bill 587, Restrict local authority over monuments: Passed 68 to 32 in the House on April 20, 2016, and failed 21 to 18 in the Senate on April 20, 2016

To prohibit local governments from removing or interfering with monuments or memorials erected for a war or conflict, such as the Civil War.

 

House Bill 1090 Prohibit state funding of abortions: Passed 64 to 35 in the House on February 16, 2016, and 21 to 19 in the Senate on March 7, 2016. Vetoed by the governor on March 29, 2016.

To ban state funding of abortions unless that funding is a state match for Medicaid. This bill also bans state funding for organizations other than a licensed hospital that perform abortions.

 

Override veto of House Bill 1090, Prohibit state funding of abortions: Failed 66 to 34 in the House on April 20, 2016

To ban state funding of abortions unless that funding is a state match for Medicaid. This bill also bans state funding for organizations other than a licensed hospital that perform abortions. This was a vote to override the governor's veto, which requires 67 votes in the affirmative.

 

House Bill 22, End tax credit for political contributions: Passed 68 to 28 in the House on February 4, 2016, and 35 to 4 on February 19, 2016

To sunset the tax credit for contributions to political candidates. This credit would end with the 2017 tax year.

 

Another Choice for President


 

FBI investigations. Accusations of sexual assault. Vicious personal attacks.

 

By any measure, it’s been an ugly presidential race. As we approach Election Day, many Americans are dissatisfied with the two major party nominees, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. If you are one of them, then there are other candidates on the ballot who would be happy to receive your vote.

 

Here are a few of the third party candidates who are also running for president this year:

 

Gary Johnson – this former two-term Republican governor of New Mexico is running under the Libertarian Party banner. He chose another former Republican governor, Bill Weld of Massachusetts, as his vice presidential candidate. Johnson is socially liberal but fiscally conservative, and takes a non-interventionist approach to foreign policy. He also ran as the Libertarian Party nominee in 2012, gaining nearly 1% of the popular vote.

 

Jill Stein – a physician, Stein is running as the Green Party nominee, which she also represented as its presidential nominee in 2012. She is running on a platform of government support for renewable energy, cancelling student loan debt, and cutting military spending. During her campaign she has participated in protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

 

Evan McMullin – a former CIA officer and chief policy director for the House Republican Conference, McMullin is running as a “conservative alternative” to Donald Trump. He is opposed to abortion, supports free trade, and takes a more hawkish view on foreign policy than does Trump. A Mormon, he is polling very well in Utah. It is possible that he may win this state, which would mean that a third party candidate would win an electoral vote for the first time since 1972 (when a GOP elector cast a rogue vote for the Libertarian Party nominee).

 

Third party candidates often perform poorly in general elections. While there are exceptions, such as Ross Perot in 1992 and George Wallace in 1968, relatively few Americans vote for candidates who are outside the two main parties. The most recent third party candidate to receive more than 1% of the popular vote was Ralph Nader. He represented the Green Party in 2000 and won 2.74% of the vote.

 

Given the unpopularity of this year’s two major party candidates, it is likely that more Americans than usual will be voting for third party nominees. Can Gary Johnson win 5% of the vote, which would be the highest level of support for a Libertarian Party nominee ever? Can Jill Stein break Ralph Nader’s record? Will Evan McMullin win Utah? These are all possibilities in this volatile election year.

 

Have you considered voting for a candidate other than Trump or Clinton this year?

 

More developer subsidies, more data center subsidies, no more film producer subsidies

 

Check out these key votes made by lawmakers during the 2015-16 Michigan Legislature, and go to www.votespotter.com to sign up and see how the people who represent you voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life.

 

Senate Bill 616, Exempt developers of “Pyramid” building from sales tax: Passed 21 to 15 in the Senate on December 3, 2015, and 61 to 45 in the House on December 15

 

To exempt business equipment purchases made by an internet data center from the state sales tax. The bill originally applied only to the developers of proposed data center in the vacant “Pyramid” building near Grand Rapids, but was expanded to all companies in this particular business.

 

Senate Bill 556, Extend “commercial rehabilitation” tax breaks for developers: Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate on November 4, 2015 and 87 to 19 in the House on December 2


To extend for another five years a “commercial rehabilitation act” that authorizes property tax breaks for owners of rehab projects involving commercial property selected by local government officials. The law was originally created with the developer of a moribund Oakland County mall in mind, and has been used to give these indirect subsidies to other developers as well.

 

House Bill 4990, Expand local government energy vendor financing schemes: Passed 102 to 4 in the House on December 8, 2015 and 34 to 0 in the Senate on May 3, 2016


To expand the things cities can spend money on under a scheme that lets them contract with vendors for energy efficiency projects to be paid for with money the projects are supposed to save (or from taxes if savings don’t appear). The bill would allow vendor installment contract duration of up to 20 years, expand the contracts to include information technology, include “lease-purchase” deals in the scheme and more.

 

House Bill 4226, Expand technology business subsidies: Passed 79 to 30 in the House on June 3, 2015 and the Senate 33 to 4 in the Senate on June 18


To increase from three to nine the number of areas in which “certified technology parks” (previously dubbed "smart zones") are allowed to expand by creating a "satellite" zone. These provide infrastructure and other subsidies to technology-based businesses.

 

House Bill 4122, Repeal film producer subsidies: Passed 24 to 13 in the Senate on June 18, 2015 and 63 to 46 in the House on the same day


To repeal the program that gives Michigan tax dollars to film producers as of October, 2016. Since 2008 some $500 million in state tax revenue has been distributed to producers.

 

Sanctuary cities, lobbying ban, Obamacare, school choice, and employer red tape

 

Check out these key votes made by elected officials in Wisconsin during the most recent legislative session, and go to www.votespotter.com to signup and see how your elected officials voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life.

 

Assembly Bill 450 Prohibit “sanctuary cities”: Passed 62 to 35 in the Assembly on February 16, 2016

To ban local governments from enacting ordinances that prohibit police from inquiring about the immigration status of someone who is lawfully arrested or from cooperating with federal immigration enforcement efforts.

 

Amendment to Senate Bill 707, Ban former legislators from lobbying: Passed 19 to 13 in the Senate on February 16, 2016

To prohibit legislators from working as lobbyists within a year after leaving the legislature.

 

Assembly Bill 342, Require travel reimbursement by elected officials seeking national office: Failed 35 to 61 in the Assembly on January 12, 2016

To require that any state elected official who is pursuing the nomination of or election to a national office must reimburse the state for the amount of state funds used to pay for travel expenses related to this pursuit of office. This vote was to suspend the rules and withdraw this bill from committee in order for the Assembly to consider it.

 

Assembly Bill 160, Impose new rules on employers firing workers: Failed 35 to 61 in the Assembly on January 12, 2016

To mandate a variety of restrictions on employers seeking to fire employees. This bill would change Wisconsin from an “at will” employment state to one where employers are limited in the circumstances under which they can terminate employees. This vote was to suspend the rules and withdraw this bill from committee in order for the Assembly to consider it.

 

Assembly Bill 462, End school choice and expand Medicaid to comply with Obamacare: Failed 35 to 61 in the Assembly on January 12, 2016

To end the state’s parental choice program which provides funding for students to attend private school. The bill would also expand Medicaid to cover childless adults in order to comply with the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare. This vote was to suspend the rules and withdraw this bill from committee in order for the Assembly to consider it.

 

Keep Guantanamo Bay prisoners locked up, close Guantanamo Bay, terror lawsuits, and Middle East war funding

 

 

Check out these key votes made by elected officials in Congress during the current legislative session, and go to www.votespotter.com to signup and see how your elected officials voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life.

 

House Bill 5351, Prevent transfer or release of Guantanamo Bay detainees: Passed 244 to 174 in the House on September 15, 2016

To prohibit any federal funding from being used to transfer or release individuals detained at Guantanamo Bay.

 

Lamborn amendment to House Bill 5293, Stop transfer of Guantanamo Bay detainees: Passed 245 to 175 in the House on June 16, 2016

To prohibit funds from being spent to survey, assess, or review potential detention locations in the United States for detainees currently held in Guantanamo Bay.

 

Nadler amendment to House Bill 4909, Allow closure of Guantanamo Bay: Failed 163 to 259 in the House on May 18, 2016

To remove the prohibition on spending funds to close the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay.

 

Override veto of Senate Bill 2040, Allow terrorism lawsuits: Passed 348 to 77 in the House and 97 to 1 in the Senate on September 28, 2016

To override President Obama's veto of legislation that would allow civil lawsuits to be brought against foreign states for injuries, death, or damages as a result of an action of terrorism.

 

Lee amendment to House Bill 5293, Prohibit spending on war in Iraq and Syria: Failed 146 to 274 in the House on June 16, 2016

To prohibit funds from being used to carry out the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force, which authorized military action against terrorism. The current military action against ISIS in Iraq and Syria are being undertaken under this 2001 authorization.

 

School spending transparency, phone fee hike, renegade plumbers, EPA carbon rule, and penalties for gun ownership

 

Check out these key votes made by elected officials in Pennsylvania during the most recent legislative session, and go to www.votespotter.com to signup and see how your elected officials voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life.

 

House Bill 224, Establish a database of receipts and expenses related to public schools: Passed 195 to 0 in the House on February 15, 2016, and 30 to 19 in the Senate on September 18, 2015. Vetoed by the governor on September 29, 2015.

To require the Department of Education to establish a searchable database of the receipts and expenses of school districts, charter and cyber charter schools, and area vocational-technical schools.

 

House Bill 911, Increase the state surcharge on all phone service: Passed 134 to 59 in the House on May 4, 2015, and 49 to 0 in the Senate on June 16, 2015

To increase the state surcharge on all phone service (wireless, landlines, and voice-over-Internet protocol) by $0.15 per month, from $1.50 to $1.65, which would require Pennsylvanians to pay an additional $326 million annually. The legislation also modifies how revenue raised from the phone service surcharge is distributed by the state to counties for maintenance and enhancement of their 911 emergency response systems.

 

Senate Bill 703, Prohibit plumbers from operating without state license: Passed 45 to 5 in the Senate on June 26, 2016

To ban anyone from working as a plumber unless he or she obtains a state license. A person seeking a license must undergo testing requirements and pay a fee. The bill established penalties for working as an unlicensed plumber of up to six months in jail and/or a fine of $1,000, or a civil fine of $10,000.

 

Senate Bill 1195, Extend consideration of federal carbon rule: Passed 41 to 9 on June 8, 2016, and 147 to 41 in the House on June 15, 2016

To extend the time that the General Assembly has to consider a state plan to comply with the federal Clean Power Plan, which regulates carbon emissions from power plants, from 100 days to 180 days. This bill also forbids the state from implementing a compliance plan until after the Supreme Court lifts its stay of the Clean Power Plan.

 

House Bill 1496, Increase penalty for illegal firearm ownership: Passed 187 to 8 in the House on June 14, 2016

To increase the penalty for felons who possess firearms from a maximum of 10 years to a maximum of 20 years.

 

Food assistance standards, school board lawsuits, EPA carbon rule, kid tanning bed ban, and gas tax

 

Check out these key votes made by elected officials in North Carolina during the most recent legislative session, and go to www.votespotter.com to signup and see how your elected officials voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life.

 

House Bill 1047, Increase standards for food assistance: Passed 74 to 39 in the House on June 16, 2016

To require that the Lottery Commission supply the Division of Social Services information on individuals who win lottery prizes in excess of $2,250 to determine if these winners are on food assistance and have not reported these winnings. The bill also sets forth increased penalties for noncompliance with work requirements, including permanent disqualification from receiving benefits on the third instance of noncompliance.

 

House Bill 726, Prohibit school boards from suing counties: Failed 52 to 66 in the House

To ban school boards from suing counties over budget appropriations for the district they represent.

 

House Bill 571, Prohibit agency compliance with federal carbon regulations: Passed 84 to 33 in the House on April 16, 2015, and 31 to 12 on August 5, 2015

To prohibit state agencies from taking actions to comply with the federal government’s “Clean Power Plan” mandate to limit carbon dioxide emissions from power plants.

 

House Bill 158, Ban minors from using tanning beds: Passed 103 to 12 in the House on April 21, 2015, and 48 to 2 in the Senate on May 13, 2015

To prohibit the owners of tanning facilities from letting anyone under the age of 18 use tanning equipment.

 

Senate Bill 20, Lock in gas tax rate: Passed 41 to 8 in the Senate on March 31, 2015, and 79 to 39 in the House on March 31, 2015

To set the gas tax at a fixed rate of 34 cents per gallon by the end of 2016. Although this is a decrease from the current rate, this legislation prevents the gas tax from decreasing below 34 cents per gallon, which under the current formula would have happened due to lower wholesale gas prices.

 

Home schoolers in public school sports, choice for students with disabilities, and armed school security officers

 

Check out these key votes made by elected officials in Virginia during the most recent legislative session, and go to www.votespotter.com to signup and see how your elected officials voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life.

 

Senate Bill 612 Allow home schoolers to participate in school sports: Passed 22 to 17 in the Senate on February 2, 2016, and 58 to 40 in the House on February 19, 2016. Vetoed by the governor on February 29, 2016.

To allow a home schooled student to participate in interscholastic programs, such as sports, offered by public schools.

 

Override veto of Senate Bill 612, Allow home schoolers to participate in school sports: Failed 21 to 18 in the Senate on April 20, 2016

To allow a home schooled student to participate in interscholastic programs, such as sports, offered by public schools. This was a vote to override the governor's veto, which requires 26 votes in the affirmative.

 

House Bill 389, Allow education choice for students with disabilities: Passed 20 to 19 in the Senate on March 7, 2016, and the House on March 8, 2016. Vetoed by the governor on April 5, 2016.

To allow a parent of a student with a disability to apply for a Parental Choice Education Savings Account, which would consist of funding for education expenses such as tuition and fees at a private school and education therapy.

 

House Bill 1234, Allow some school security officers to carry firearms: Passed 24 to 14 in the Senate on February 29, 2016, and 66 to 32 in the House on March 2, 2016. Vetoed by the governor on April 6, 2016.

To permit a school security officer to carry a firearm if he or she is a retired law enforcement officer and the local school board grants authority to do so.

 

Override veto of House Bill 1234, Allow some school security officers to carry firearms: Failed 66 to 34 in the House on April 20, 2016.

To permit a school security officer to carry a firearm if he or she is a retired law enforcement officer and the local school board grants authority to do so. This was a vote to override the governor’s veto, which requires 67 votes in the affirmative.

 

Limiting Use of Forced Union Labor in Public Works, Making Union Firefighters More Expensive

 

Check out these key votes made by elected officials in Ohio earlier this year, and go to www.votespotter.com to sign up and see how your elected officials voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life.

 

Senate Bill 152 Prohibit requiring union labor agreements in public works projects: Passed 50 to 45 in the House on 5/4/2016

 

To prohibit a public authority from requiring a contractor to employ a certain percentage of individuals from the geographic area of the public authority for public works and to prohibit a state agency from mandating union labor agreements as a condition of performing or bidding on a public improvement project.

 

Senate Bill 27 Make it easier for firefighters to collect worker’s compensation payments without medical review: Passed 32 to 1 in the Senate on 4/13/2016

 

To provide that a firefighter who has specified types of cancer does not have to prove through medical evidence that it was caused while performing official duties as a firefighter.

 

House Bill 284 Expand the list of crimes that would result in the forfeit of public pension benefits.  Passed 95 to 2 in the House on 5/24/2016

 

To add additional offenses to the offenses committed by an active or retired public employees that would result in termination or forfeiture of their pension or disability benefits.

 

House Bill 347 Reform and restrain the Civil Asset Forfeiture process: Passed 72 to 25 in the House on 5/25/2016

To limit opportunities for the state to seize assets from citizens without adequate due process of law, and to enhance the burden of proof required to do so.

 

Mandate multicultural schools; criminalize false charity reports; expand police ‘profiling’ ban

 

 

Check out these key votes made by elected officials in Colorado earlier this year, and go to www.votespotter.com to sign up and see how your elected officials voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life.

 

House Bill 1036 Require civic and multicultural education in public schools: Passed 36 to 29 in the House on 5/2/2016

 

To require public schools to provide instruction on US and Colorado history and governance, including material on the history, culture, and contributions of the American Indians, Hispanic Americans, African Americans, and Asian Americans.

 

House Bill 1334 Expand subsidies for real estate developers: Passed 34 to 31 in the House on 4/14/2016

 

To authorize the Board of County Commissioners of any county to enact ordinances, resolutions, or other forms of binding law to create programs that subsidize low-income housing developers in unincorporated areas of the county.

 

House Bill 1318 Make it a crime to make false statements in a charity's financial reports: Passed 53 to 11 in the House on 4/14/2016

 

To make falsifying a charitable organization's financial reports or registration documents a second degree perjury offense.

Senate Bill 144 Allow military personnel who are under 21 years old to obtain a permit to carry a concealed handgun: Passed 21 to 14 in the Senate on 5/2/2106

 

To approve concealed carry permits for certain military personal who are not otherwise old enough to apply.

 

House Bill 1295 Create the Chicano special license plate: Passed 34 to 31 in the House on 4/14/2016

 

To create the Chicano special license plate. A person can use the plate if they provide a certificate confirming a donation to an organization chosen by the Department of Revenue based on the organization's provision of services to the Latino community.

 

House Bill 1263 Expand the definition of "profiling" by police officers: Passed 26 to 9 in the Senate on 3/31/2016

 

To add gender, national origin, language, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, and disability to those categories which the police must generally not use in performing their duties so that they do not "profile" suspects

 

Watch list gun control, ammo regulation, Amtrak funding, ban transactions with Iran

 

Check out these key votes made by elected officials in Congress during the current legislative session, and go to www.votespotter.com to signup and see how your elected officials voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life.

 

McConnell Amendment to House Bill 2578, Screen gun transfers to suspected terrorists: Failed 53 to 47 in the Senate on June 20, 2016

To establish a procedure that lets a judge review and deny gun sales to someone who has been investigated as a known or suspected terrorist. An individual could dispute the charges, but if there is probable cause that the person has or will commit an act of terrorism, he or she could be arrested. This was a vote for cloture, or to bring debate to an end, and required 60 votes to succeed.

 

Feinstein amendment to House Bill 2578, Deny gun transfers to suspected terrorists: Failed 47 to 53 in the Senate on June 20, 2016

To give the Attorney General authority to ban firearm sales to someone Attorney General concludes is engaged in or preparing for terrorism. This was a vote for cloture, or to bring debate to an end, and required 60 votes to succeed.

 

Massie Amendment to House Bill 2578, Prohibit agencies from defining rifle ammunition as armor-piercing: Passed 250 to 171 in the House on June 3, 2015

To prevent federal agencies from defining ammunition as “armor-piercing” unless that ammunition is intended to be used in handguns. Many types of standard rifle ammunition in wide use could be restricted under rules recently proposed by the Obama administration, because possession of armor-piercing ammunition is subject to stringent regulations.

 

House Bill 749, Appropriate $1.88 billion for Amtrak: Passed 316 to 101 in the House on March 4, 2015

To authorize $1.88 billion in federal subsidies for Amtrak passenger rail service through 2019.

 

House Bill 4992, Restrict financial transactions with Iran: Passed 246 to 181 in the House on July 14, 2016

To authorize regulations that prohibit financial institutions from directly or indirectly transferring dollars to Iran until the president certifies it is not supporting acts of international terrorism or developing weapons of mass destruction.

 

Medical marijuana, right to try experimental medication, no pensions for felons, laying off bad teachers, unborn child murder

 

Check out these key votes made by elected officials in Pennsylvania during the most recent legislative session, and go to www.votespotter.com to signup and see how your elected officials voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life.

 

House Bill 1799, Impose life sentence for murder of an unborn child: Passed 152 to 37 in the House on May 24, 2016

To provide the penalty of life in prison for the murder of an unborn child.

 

House Bill 17, Strip pensions of public employee felons: Passed 188 to 2 in the House on May 18, 2016

To remove pensions from public employees convicted of, or pleading guilty to, felonies or crimes which are punishable by a prison sentence of more than five years.

 

House Bill 805, Require schools to lay off poor performing teachers first: Passed 100 to 91 in the House on June 23, 2015, and 26 to 22 in the Senate on May 9, 2016

To require school districts, when facing a situation where they must reduce employees, to lay off or dismiss teachers who have ratings of “failing” or “needs improvement” first. This would end the current practice of laying off or dismissing teachers based on seniority.

 

Senate Bill 3, Allow use of medical marijuana: Passed 40 to 7 in the Senate on May 12, 2015, and 149 to 43 in the House on April 13, 2016

To permit the use of medical marijuana with a doctor's certification. Under this legislation, medical marijuana may not be smoked or used in edible form, but can be used in pill, oil, liquid, or topical forms, and it may also be vaporized.

 

House Bill 1104, Allow terminal patients access to more medication: Passed 182 to 0 in the House on June 15, 2016

To allow terminally ill patients the ability to obtain drugs that have not yet been approved for general use by the Food and Drug Administration. These drugs must have already gone through trials to determine their safety, and can only be obtained upon a recommendation from a physician.

 

Fantasy sports, guns in government workers’ cars, concealed firearms with protective orders, voter pledges, redistricting

 

Check out these key votes made by elected officials in Virginia during the most recent legislative session, and go to www.votespotter.com to signup and see how your elected officials voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life.

 

Senate Bill 646, Regulate fantasy sports contests: Passed 28 to 10 in the Senate on February 8, 2016, and 80 to 20 in the House on February 20, 2016

To require the operators of fantasy sports contents register with the state and to clarify that these contests are not illegal gambling.

 

Senate Bill 686, Prohibit primary voter pledges: Passed 34 to 5 in the Senate on February 8, 2016

To prohibit political parties from requiring voters sign any pledge, including one to support the party’s nominee, before casting a vote in a primary election.

 

Senate Bill 770, Require compact territories in redistricting: Passed 21 to 19 in the Senate on February 8, 2016

To require that congressional and legislative district be composed of compact territory. This is aimed at ending districts that are oddly shaped or have irregular or contorted boundaries, unless they can be justified because the district adheres to political subdivision lines.

 

House Bill 382, Allow state workers to have firearms in their cars: Passed 65 to 32 in the House on February 4, 2016, and 24 to 14 on February 29, 2016

To prohibit state agencies or higher education institutions from banning employees from storing firearms or ammunition in their cars while at their workplace.

 

House Bill 766, Allow concealed carry with protective order: Passed 68 to 29 in the House on February 3, 2016, and the Senate 31 to 9 on February 22, 2016

To allow anyone who is protected by a protective order to carry a concealed weapon without a permit for 45 days after the order is issued. Only Virginians eligible under state law to carry a concealed weapon would be allowed to do this.

 

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