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Tennessee Senate Bill 1180

 

Check out this key bill voted on by elected officials in Tennessee, check-in to the VoteSpotter app to see how your legislators voted, and comment below to share what you think!

 

Senate Bill 1180, Ban post-viability abortions: Passed 27 to 3 in the state Senate and 38 to 0 in the state House on May 3, 2017

 

To ban abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy unless a doctor certifies that a fetus is not viable or that the procedure is necessary for the life or health of the mother.

 

Comment below to share what you think of Tennessee Senate Bill 1180!

 

Nevada Assembly Bill 99

 

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Assembly Bill 99: Accommodating LGBTQ youth in the foster care system: Passed 26 to 15 in the state Assembly on March 9, 2017 and 18 to 2 in the state Senate on April 4, 2017

 

To revise statutes and require new regulations pertaining to the Nevada foster care system to require that  youth in out-of-home placements must be treated, in all respects, in accordance with the child's gender identity or expression, regardless of their assigned sex at birth.

 

Comment below to share what you think of Nevada Assembly Bill 99!

 

Michigan House Bill 4416

 

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House Bill 4416, Allow law-abiding citizens to carry pistol without special permit: Passed 59 to 49 in the state House on May 7, 2017

 

To establish that a law-abiding citizen may carry a concealed pistol in public. In other words, the bill would eliminate the requirement that an individual who is not prohibited by law from possessing a firearm must get a special permit to carry a concealed pistol.

 

Comment below to share what you think of Michigan House Bill 4416!

 

Missouri House Bill 174

 

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House Bill 174, Protect pro-life speech and rights of conscience: Passed 105 to 44 in the state House on March 30, 2017

 

To prevent municipalities from limiting the rights of speech afforded to abortion-alternative providers, or requiring support of or participation in programs, services, or activities related to abortion if such participation is contrary to the religious beliefs or moral convictions of such person.

 

Comment below to share what you think of Missouri House Bill 174!

 

A Right to Try Experimental Drugs

 

If you have a terminal illness, what types of drugs should be available to you? Should you have the right to try medicine that has proven to be safe, but has not yet met federal standards of effectiveness?

 

That is the question that is behind the debate over “right to try laws.” These laws would allow patients with a terminal illness to have access to experimental medication, as long as their use is supervised by a doctor.

 

Thirty-three states have passed “right to try” laws. The Alaska House of Representatives passed legislation this year, as did both houses in the Iowa legislature. Other states, such as Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Rhode Island, are considering similar bills.

 

Supporters of this legislation say that patients who are facing death should have the right to try any medication that could possibly cure their disease or prolong their life. Critics contend that these laws give patients false hope and could possibly interfere with drug trials.

 

Congress is also considering federal legislation that would have more impact than state bills. As a federal agency, the Food and Drug Administration is not subject to state authority. That means that state laws do not have a direct impact on whether or not patients can obtain this medication.

 

President Trump has expressed support for this effort. When he was governor of Indiana, Vice President Mike Pence signed a “right to try” bill into law.

 

Regardless of the controversy in the medical community or the practical impact, “right to try” laws garner strong bipartisan support in the states where they are considered. With health care a hot topic in Washington, D.C., we could see action on a national bill this year.

 

Do you support “right to try” legislation?

 

Nevada Senate Bill 201

 

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Senate Bill 201, Ban conversion therapy for minors: Passed 15 to 5 in the state Senate on April 4, 2017 and 31 to 8 in the state Assembly on May 9, 2017

 

To prohibit psychotherapists from providing conversion therapy, generally described as counseling designed to change a person's sexual orientation from homosexual or bisexual to heterosexual, to a person who is under 18 years of age.

 

Comment below to share what you think of Nevada Senate Bill 201!

 

New Hampshire House Bill 589

 

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House Bill 589, Kill a bill to end buffer zones for abortion clinic protests: Passed 191 to 163 in the state House on March 9, 2017

 

To repeal existing state statutes providing certain parameters for access to reproductive health care facilities, given that similar provisions in a Massachusetts "buffer zone" law were found unconstitutional by the US Supreme Court. A yes vote kills the bill for the legislative year.

 

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Pennsylvania House Bill 1008

 

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House Bill 1008, Remove marriage waiting period: Passed 194 to 0 in the state House on May 23, 2017

 

To remove the commonwealth’s 3-day waiting period for a marriage license. The bill also allows former mayors, former or retired justices, judges or magisterial district judges to perform marriages.

 

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Colorado Senate Bill 284

 

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Senate Bill 284, Mandate physicians give specified information to patients at least 24 hours before an abortion: Passed 19 to 16 in the state Senate on April 13, 2017

 

To require a physician whose patient has elected to have an abortion to provide verbal and written disclosures that must include any pending disciplinary or legal action against the physician, a detailed description of technical elements of the method of abortion selected, a list of physical and psychological risks associated with abortion, information on reversing certain abortion methods, and details on alternatives to abortion. Providers must also provide an opportunity to view or decline to view ultrasound images and listen to the fetal heartbeat. The disclosures would also require physicians to provide patients with a list of ultrasound providers nearby with particular emphasis on providers that do not charge a fee. Patients could refuse to sign the disclosure if they feel they have not been properly informed.

 

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Michigan House Bill 4557

 

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House Bill 4557, Authorize prison for bringing 26 or more cases of beer or wine into state: Passed 99 to 8 in the state House on May 25, 2017

 

To authorize up to four years in prison and a $5,000 fine for bringing more than around 26 cases of wine or beer into the state without all the required licenses mandated by the state. Smaller quantities would be subject to 93 days in jail.

 

Comment below to share what you think of Michigan House Bill 4557!

 

Pennsylvania Removing Restrictions on Alcohol Sales

 

It could soon be a little less complicated to buy alcohol in Pennsylvania.

 

On April 25, the state House of Representatives passed these bills that would make significant changes alcohol sales in the commonwealth:

 

House Bill 991, Allow private retailers to sell liquor: Passed 107 to 83 in the House

To permit private retailers, rather than the state government, to sell liquor. One retail license will be allocated per every 6,000 residents per county, with a minimum of 15 per county. Under this bill, retail stores would be allowed to operate from 9 a.m. until 11 p.m. every day except Sunday. A special Sunday sale permit could be purchased for $5,000.

 

House Bill 975, Allow private wholesale wine sales: Passed 107 to 84 in the House

To allow private companies to sell wholesale wine instead of requiring that wholesale wine sales must be done by the state.

 

House Bill 438, Allow restaurants to sell liquor to go: Passed 102 to 90 in the House

To allow restaurants and hotels to purchase a permit for $2,000 that would allow them to sell up to four bottles of liquor to a customer for consumption off-premises.

 

House Bill 1075, End state’s wholesale liquor sales: Passed 105 to 84 in the House

To end the system where the commonwealth sells liquor wholesale. State-run wholesale liquor sales would be phased out over 10 years under this legislation.

 

These bills build on legislation last year that eased some state restrictions on how restaurants and other retailers sell beer and wine. The biggest change under this year’s bills is ending the state monopoly on hard alcohol sales. Currently, if you want a bottle of vodka, you must buy it from the government. If HB 991 passes the Senate and is signed by the governor, the government would be getting out of the alcohol business.

 

Do you support these bills? Should the sale of alcohol be something done by the private market, not the government? Or should there be tighter government control on the sale of intoxicating beverages?

 

Tennessee House Bill 798: Update state alcohol laws

 

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House Bill 798, Update state alcohol laws: Passed 27 to 0 in the state Senate on April 10, 2017 and 64 to 21 in the state House on May 1, 2017

 

To levy a $10,000 fine on an establishment for its second citation for selling alcohol to a minor instead of revoking the alcohol license, to allow hotels to sell sealed packages of alcohol, to mandate the inclusion of liquor-by-the-drink taxes on menus, and to make other changes to the state’s alcohol laws.

 

Comment below to share what you think of Tennessee Senate Bill 798!

 

North Carolina House Bill 33: Restore firearm rights to some nonviolent felons

 

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House Bill 33, Restore firearm rights to some nonviolent felons: Passed 113 to 2 in the state House on March 22, 2017

 

To restore the right to own firearms to nonviolent felons who had previously had those rights restored only to lose them due to subsequent change in state law. A nonviolent felon who completed his sentence by December 1, 1995, was allowed ownership of rifles and shotguns until laws passed in 2004 and 2010 that banned all felons from owning any firearms for 20 years.

 

Comment below to share what you think of North Carolina House Bill 33!

 

Wisconsin Senate Bill 10: Allow wider use of cannabidiol oil

 

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Senate Bill 10, Allow wider use of cannabidiol oil: Passed 31 to 1 in the state Senate on February 8, 2017

 

To allow the possession of cannabidiol oil with the certification from a physician that the oil is for the treatment of a medical condition. Current law allows the possession of cannabidiol only for the treatment of seizures.

 

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New Hampshire Senate Bill 12: Allow concealed pistol carry without a license

 

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Senate Bill 12, Allow concealed pistol carry without a license: Passed 13 to 10 in the state Senate on January 19, 2017

 

To repeal the requirement to obtain a license to carry a concealed pistol or revolver and to make certain other modifications to state gun laws.

 

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Pennsylvania Senate Bill 3: Limit Dismemberment Abortions

 

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Senate Bill 3, Limit Dismemberment Abortions: Passed 32 to 18 in the state Senate on February 8, 2017

 

To impose strict limits on the use of abortions using the technique of dilation and evacuation, or dismemberment, and to ban the use of this technique, with limited exceptions, before 20 weeks of pregnancy.

 

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Virginia House Joint Resolution 549: Recognize Pornography as a Public Health Hazard

 

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House Joint Resolution 549, Recognize Pornography as a Public Health Hazard: Passed 82 to 8 in the state House on February 2, 2017

 

To state that the House recognizes “pornography as leading to individual and societal harms” and that there is a “need for education, prevention, research, and policy change at the community and societal level” regarding pornography.

 

Comment below to share what you think of Virginia House Joint Resolution 549!

 

Gun Control in Virginia

 

The issue of gun control is a hot topic in many states, and Virginia is no exception. With its Republican-dominated legislature, the Commonwealth’s lawmakers have advanced legislation in recent years that would expand the rights of gun owners. This has met some resistance from Governor Terry McAuliffe, a Democrat, although the two branches of government have found some common ground on this issue.

 

The beginning of the 2017 legislative session has already seen action on firearms legislation. For the most part, these bills are aimed at expanding the right for Virginians to carry concealed firearms:

 

House Bill 1582, Lower age for concealed handgun permit for military members: Passed 78 to 19 in the state House on January 18, 2017

 

To allow an active duty military member or a military member who has received an honorable discharge to obtain a concealed handgun permit at the age of 18. Current law allows concealed handgun permits for anyone 21 years of age or older.

 

Senate Bill 1362, Allow non-duty military personnel to carry concealed weapons: Passed 22 to 18 in the state Senate on January 24, 2017

 

To allow members of the Virginia National Guard, Virginia Defense Force, Armed Forces of the United States, or Armed Forces Reserves who is on non-duty status to carry a concealed weapon without a permit.

 

Senate Bill 1299, Allow concealed carry with protective order: Passed 27 to 13 in the state Senate on January 24, 2017

 

To allow anyone who is protected by a protective order to carry a concealed weapon without a permit for 45 days after the protective order is issued. Only Virginians eligible under state law to carry a concealed weapon would be permitted to do this.

 

North Carolina Senate Bill 4: Repeal the 'Bathroom' Bill

 

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Senate Bill 4, Repeal the bathroom bill: Failed 16 to 32 in the state Senate on December 21, 2016

 

To repeal HB 2, which prohibited local governments from enacting anti-discrimination laws or employment mandates that are stricter than state law, effectively preempting Charlotte’s transgendered discrimination act. HB 2 also required schools and government agencies to designate bathrooms for people of their biological sex and requires that only people of that biological sex can use a bathroom with that designation, in addition to restricting protection from sex discrimination to discrimination based on biological sex.

 

Senate Bull 4, Amendment to allow local employment or public accommodation laws: Passed 33 to 16 in the state Senate on December 21, 2016

 

To table, or kill, an amendment to the HB 2 repeal legislation that would remove the section that banned local governments from enacting laws regulating employment practices or public accommodations or access to bathrooms or showers for six months.

U.S. House Bill 7: Ban Federal Funding of Abortion

 

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U.S. House Bill 7, Ban federal funding of abortion: Passed 238 to 183 in the U.S. House on January 24, 2017

 

To prohibit using federal government money to pay for abortions. The bill would make permanent the “Hyde Amendment,” which has been attached to annual spending bills to prohibit federal funding of abortions. It (or another one-year Hyde amendment) would prohibit Medicaid or other federal programs from paying for abortions, and prohibit insurance companies from selling policies that pay for abortions through the federal health care law exchanges.

 

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