Fantasy sports, guns in government workers’ cars, concealed firearms with protective orders, voter pledges, redistricting

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Fantasy sports, guns in government workers’ cars, concealed firearms with protective orders, voter pledges, redistricting

 

Check out these key votes made by elected officials in Virginia during the most recent legislative session, and go to www.votespotter.com to signup and see how your elected officials voted on these and other issues that impact your daily life.

 

Senate Bill 646, Regulate fantasy sports contests: Passed 28 to 10 in the Senate on February 8, 2016, and 80 to 20 in the House on February 20, 2016

To require the operators of fantasy sports contents register with the state and to clarify that these contests are not illegal gambling.

 

Senate Bill 686, Prohibit primary voter pledges: Passed 34 to 5 in the Senate on February 8, 2016

To prohibit political parties from requiring voters sign any pledge, including one to support the party’s nominee, before casting a vote in a primary election.

 

Senate Bill 770, Require compact territories in redistricting: Passed 21 to 19 in the Senate on February 8, 2016

To require that congressional and legislative district be composed of compact territory. This is aimed at ending districts that are oddly shaped or have irregular or contorted boundaries, unless they can be justified because the district adheres to political subdivision lines.

 

House Bill 382, Allow state workers to have firearms in their cars: Passed 65 to 32 in the House on February 4, 2016, and 24 to 14 on February 29, 2016

To prohibit state agencies or higher education institutions from banning employees from storing firearms or ammunition in their cars while at their workplace.

 

House Bill 766, Allow concealed carry with protective order: Passed 68 to 29 in the House on February 3, 2016, and the Senate 31 to 9 on February 22, 2016

To allow anyone who is protected by a protective order to carry a concealed weapon without a permit for 45 days after the order is issued. Only Virginians eligible under state law to carry a concealed weapon would be allowed to do this.

 

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