McAuliffe’s Vetoes Stick in Virginia

Commentary & Community

McAuliffe’s Vetoes Stick in Virginia

 

Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe has vetoed more bills than any other governor in the commonwealth’s history. Remarkably, none of these vetoes have been overridden by legislators. That record still stands after a recent veto-override session of the General Assembly.


Legislators met on April 5 to vote on overriding Gov. McAuliffe’s vetoes of bills that emerged from the General Assembly this year. In the Senate, 27 votes are needed to override a veto. Republicans have a 21-19 edge in that chamber, so 6 Democrats would have to join the GOP in any override vote. In the House, legislators need 67 votes to override a veto. With a 66 to 34 edge in that chamber, it is easier for Republicans to peel off a Democratic vote to be successful. However, the House was unable to muster a 67-vote majority to override any bill this session.

 

Here are some of the bills vetoed by Gov. McAuliffe this year which are now officially dead after override efforts failed:

 

HB 1400, Allow students to take online schooling: Passed 57 to 40 in the House on February 7 and 22 to 18 in the Senate on February 21

To establish the Virginia Virtual School, which will serve up to 5,000 Virginia student. This online education must meet state standards and will be available beginning 2019.

 

House Bill 1468, Mandate cooperation with federal immigration authorities: Passed 68 to 31 in the House on January 25 and 21 to 19 in the Senate on February 13

To mandate that corrections officials and sheriffs comply with request from the federal government to turn over an incarcerated alien to them.

 

House Bill 2002, Mandate reporting of refugee or immigrant resettlement: Passed 59 to 36 in the House on February 3 and 21 to 19 in the Senate on February 14

To mandate that nonprofits resettlement agencies for immigrants or refugees make an annual report to the state of the number of individuals resettled, the demographic information of those resettled, and the locality where they were resettled.

 

Senate Bill 1362, Allow nonduty military personnel to carry concealed weapons: Passed 22 to 18 in the Senate on January 24 and 67 to 32 in the House on February 22

To allow members of the Virginia National Guard, Virginia Defense Force, Armed Forces of the United States, or Armed Forces Reserves who is on nonduty status to carry a concealed weapon without a permit.

 

Senate Bill 872, Require photo ID for absentee ballots: Passed 20 to 19 in the Senate on January 30 and 60 to 38 in the House on February 14

To require that anyone requesting an absentee ballot by mail to include a copy of his or her photo ID with the request. When the voter submits the completed ballot, he or she must also submit a copy of his or her photo ID. Exempt from this requirement are military and overseas voters as well as voters with disabilities.

 

Senate Bill 1455, Criminalize payments for registering to vote: Passed 21 to 19 in the Senate on January 30 and 60 to 29 in the House on February 14

To make it a felony to offer a payment to someone in exchange for that person registering to vote.

 

Senate Bill 1299, Allow concealed carry with protective order: Passed 27 to 13 in the Senate on January 24 and 66 to 32 in the House on February 14

To allow anyone who is protected by a protective order to carry a concealed weapon without a permit for 45 days after the protective order is issued. Only Virginians eligible under state law to carry a concealed weapon would be permitted to do this.

 

 

Do you think that legislators should have overridden his vetoes of some of these bills? Or are you happy that legislators sustained the governor’s vetoes?

 

Copyright © 2018 Votespotter Inc. All rights reserved.