Gerrymandering Reform Gets a Hearing in North Carolina

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Gerrymandering Reform Gets a Hearing in North Carolina

Recent years have seen bitter legislative and court battles over North Carolina’s congressional and legislative districts. With another legal case looming, a legislative committee is considering three bills that would overhaul the way the state draws election districts.

 

Under two of the bills being heard this week, the state would establish independent commissions that would draw the lines of legislative and congressional districts. Another bill would empower legislative staff to draw these districts. Under each bill being considered, however, the criteria being used is aimed at making it more difficult to shape districts so they favor one party over another.

 

The bills accomplish this goal in a few ways. They require that there not be any large discrepancies in the population of districts, that the land areas of the districts be contiguous, and that political affiliation of voters in the districts not be considered. These would prevent oddly-shaped districts that link together voters of a certain political party from being designed.

 

Currently, legislators approve congressional and legislative districts. This had led to the charge that Republicans have gerrymandered the districts to cement their hold on political power. Democrats and minority voters complain that these districts disenfranchise them by diluting their voting power. These arguments have won over some judges, who have invalidated the legislatively-drawn districts as being unconstitutional.

 

The legislation under consideration in the legislature this week is bipartisan. It copies procedures used in other states that are aimed at minimizing gerrymandering attempts.

 

Do you support independent commissions designing congressional and legislative districts in order to cut down on gerrymandering?

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